Security: providing protection from present and future hacks

Pelo Fitness spinning class

One of the best things about Drupal is its security. When tens of thousands of developers work collectively on an open source project, they find all the holes and gaps, and strive to fix them. When one is found, patches go out immediately to keep sites safe and secure. But a site is only secure if those patches are applied when they are released.

Pelo Fitness is a Marin County-based community dedicated to a culture of fitness. They offer cycling, strength, yoga & nutrition programs customized to an individual’s needs and fitness level. Whether someone is a competitive athlete, a busy executive or a soccer mom (or perhaps all three), their programs are designed to build strength and endurance, burn calories and boost energy.

Yet their site was weak since they hadn’t applied a few major Drupal security updates. There was a concern that the site could be hacked and jeopardize client information. Pelo Fitness customers use the site to purchase class credits and reserve bikes for upcoming classes, requiring users to log in and enter personal information.

Want to keep your site secure? Contact us to get started. 

The solution

Kanopi performed all the security updates to get the Pelo Fitness on the latest version of Drupal. All out of date modules were updated, and the site was scanned for suspicious folders and code; anything that looked suspect was fixed. Care was taken not to push code during high traffic times when reservations were being made, so code was pushed live during specific break times that would allow for the least disruption. Lastly the site was also moved over to Pantheon for managed hosting.

Due to the Drupal support provided by Kanopi, the Pelo Fitness website is now protected and secure. Inspired to make all their systems stronger, Pelo Fitness also switched to a different email system as well so all their tech solutions were more up to date.

How to keep your site secure

Websites are living organisms in their way, and need constant care and feeding. It’s imperative to always apply critical security patches when they come out so your users information (and your own) is kept secure at all times. There are a few simple things that you can do on your Drupal site to minimize your chances of being hacked.

  • Stay up to date! Just like Pelo Fitness, make sure you pay attention to security updates for both Drupal core and your contributed modules. Security releases always happen on Wednesdays so it’s easy to keep an eye out for them. To stay up to date, you can subscribe via email or RSS on Drupal.org or follow @drupalsecurity on Twitter.
  • Enable two-factor authentication on your site. It’s a few seconds of pain for an exponential increase in security. This is easily one of the best ways to increase the security of your site. And besides, it helps you makes sure you always know where your phone is. The TFA module provides a pluggable architecture for using the authentication platform of your choice, and Google Authenticator integration is available already as part of their basic functionality.
  • Require strong passwords. Your site is only as secure as the people who log into it. If everyone uses their pet’s name as their password, you can be in trouble even if your code base is “bulletproof” (nothing ever is). The Password Policy module sets the gold standard for traditional password strength requirements, or you can check out the Password Strength module if XKCD-style entropy is more your thing.
  • Make sure you’re running over a secured connection. If you don’t already have an SSL (TLS, technically, but that’s another story) certificate on your website, now is the time! Not sure? If your site loads using http:// instead of https://, then you don’t have one. An SSL certificate protects your users’ activities on the site (both site visitors and administrators) from being intercepted by potential hackers.
  • Encrypt sensitive information. If the unthinkable happens and someone gets hold of your data, encryption is the next line of defense. If you’re storing personally identifying information (PII) like email addresses, you can encrypt that data from the field level on up to the whole database. The Encrypt module serves as the foundation for this functionality; check out the module page and you can build up from there.
  • Don’t let administrators use PHP in your content. Seriously. The PHP filter module can get the job done quickly, but it’s incredibly dangerous to the security of your site. Think seriously about including JavaScript this way, too. If your staff can do it, so can a hacker.
  • Think about your infrastructure. The more sites you run on a single server, the less secure it is. And if Drupal is up to date, but your server operating system and software isn’t, you still have problems. Use web application and IP firewalls to take your security even further. 

Contact us at Kanopi if you need help keeping your site secure.

Katherine White, Director of Engineering
Katherine White

Katherine is a Solutions Architect with a proven track record spanning 15 years of client-facing technology leadership, strategy and development team management. As an experienced cross-functional team leader and full-stack web developer, she guides project teams while serving as a solutions focused trusted client partner.

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